Arthroscopic Surgeries

Arthroscopic Surgeries.
(ACLR, PCLR,Legament Reconstruction , Meniscal & cartilege repair,
Rotator cutt repair , Shoulder instabilities and pathologies)

Arthroscopy (also called arthroscopic or keyhole surgery) is a minimally invasive surgical procedure on a joint in which an examination and sometimes treatment of damage is performed using an arthroscope, an endoscope that is inserted into the joint through a small incision. Arthroscopic procedures can be performed during ACL reconstruction. While commonly used for meniscal injuries to the knee, this use is not supported by any evidence for its claimed positive results

Orthopeadic Surgeon in Nashik | Joint Replacement Surgeon in Nashik

By attaching the arthroscope to a miniature television camera, the surgeon is able to see the interior of the joint through this very small incision rather than a large incision needed for surgery.

The television camera attached to the arthroscope displays the image of the joint on a television screen, allowing the surgeon to look, for example, throughout the knee. This lets the surgeon see the cartilage, ligaments, and under the kneecap. The surgeon can determine the amount or type of injury and then repair or correct the problem, if it is necessary.

Why is arthroscopy necessary?

Diagnosing joint injuries and disease begins with a thorough medical history, physical examination, and usually X-rays. Additional tests such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) also scan may be needed.

Through the arthroscope, a final diagnosis is made, which may be more accurate than through “open” surgery or from X-ray studies.

Disease and injuries can damage bones, cartilage, ligaments, muscles, and tendons. Some of the most frequent conditions found during arthroscopic examinations of joints are:

Inflammation

For example, synovitis is an inflammation of the lining in the knee, shoulder, elbow, wrist, or ankle.

Acute or Chronic Injury

  • Shoulder: Rotator cuff tendon tears, impingement syndrome, and recurrent dislocations
  • Knee: Meniscal (cartilage) tears, chondromalacia (wearing or injury of cartilage cushion), and anterior cruciate ligament tears with instability
  • Wrist: Carpal tunnel syndrome
  • Loose bodies of bone and/or cartilage: for example, knee, shoulder, elbow, ankle, or wrist